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  1. #1
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    Default Charter school vs. public school

    I had an interview last week, for the first time, with a charter school. They haven't offered me the job yet, though I expect to be, as the interview went very well.

    The thing is, I have only ever wanted to work in the public schools. It is my understanding that charter and private schools, while favorable in some areas, don't pay very well. Hey, public schools pay badly enough. And I know that this particular charter school pays the state minimum.

    So, I ask all you other teachers...should I seriously consider working in a charter school? Why, or why not?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Bloons Tower Defense 4 Champion, Papa's Burgeria Champion, Guardian Rock Champion, Globs Champion mopar's Avatar
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    I think it is job versus no job. I would favor having a job over not teaching, especially with everything else you've been through. It gives you a chance to get back into the teaching world faster than waiting until next fall.

    Plus, many charter/private schools have no state testing or less high stakes testing. You may also have more freedom in how you teach as well as the curriculum used. But be careful to research their teaching philosophy. Charter schools tend to have many differences!

    One charter school near me teaches in Spanish to English only students all day so that they can learn another language. Another charter school intertwines environment into all lessons. Yet, another teaches all subjects as a unit that the students can pick-so no grade levels...Just something else to consider.

  3. #3
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    Very good observation, Mopar. Yes, you are aware of the problems I have had this past year, so your point about taking the job to get back into the game is well taken.

    Fortunately, this particular charter school is accredited with the Texas Education Agency, and they follow its requirements pretty much to the letter. Also, as this school is connected with a drug/alcohol rehab facility, the teaching is a bit different than the typical public school.

    There are only 40 students at the school, and only 12 of them are full time. The rehab kids are only in school 4 hours a day. There is no homework, as the kids can't bring anything into or out of the school. Also, due to the nature of the facility, the students kind of rotate in and out reqularly, meaning very few of the students would be with me for the whole year.

    I would be responsible for teaching 7th and 8th grade math, Algebra 1 and 2, Geometry, Math Models, and Calculus. This sounds like a pretty heavy load, however, the students are essentially self-studying, with me being more of a tutor than a traditional classroom teacher. My class would be made up of students all studying different math subjects. I have taught in this kind of setting before though, as I was a GED teacher for two years several years ago. So, this job would not require anywhere near the lesson planning that I am used to.

    All things considered, I think it would be in my best interest to accept the job, despite the low pay, if it is indeed offered to me. I can always look for a better paying job later. Then again, I may end up loving this job so much that I won't want to leave. You never know.

    Thanks for the feedback.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Bloons Tower Defense 4 Champion, Papa's Burgeria Champion, Guardian Rock Champion, Globs Champion mopar's Avatar
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    You're right! You never know and a paycheck is better than getting nothing or waiting to sub... Even with a job, you can always search for something else. As there is a position available mid-year, I would think that it is not a regular year long contract position....

  5. #5

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    Honestly, I'd have to agree with Mopar. At this point for you, it's a paycheck or no paycheck. Although I don't like the idea of teaching students who are all working on different things, much like study hall, but that's just me. I hated study hall in high school, so I would hate to teach it. But honestly, if I were in your position, I would accept the job. When the breeze starts a blowing, there's nothing better than having a solid rock to hold everything down.
    Who dares to teach must never cease to learn.

  6. #6
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    I loved study hall. It was the rest of school I didn't like. I would have never thought back then that I would end up becoming a school teacher, much less a math teacher. I came to love learning, and my appreciation for education in general, late in life.

    Thanks for the agreement englishrocks. I will most likely accept the job if it is offered to me. Fortunately, I was just approved to receive unemployment benefits yesterday, so I at least I have some financial breathing room now. This will give me the option to wait for New Years, when quite a few teachers quit or retire, if I want to wait for other possible jobs. But, as they say...a bird in the hand...God, I'm so confused...lol.

  7. #7
    Super Moderator hweber's Avatar
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    I would agree with Mopar and Englishrocks, a bird in the hand... Get back into the profession and do what you love.

    Good luck, I hope you hear something soon.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Plado View Post
    I loved study hall. It was the rest of school I didn't like. I would have never thought back then that I would end up becoming a school teacher, much less a math teacher. I came to love learning, and my appreciation for education in general, late in life.

    Thanks for the agreement englishrocks. I will most likely accept the job if it is offered to me. Fortunately, I was just approved to receive unemployment benefits yesterday, so I at least I have some financial breathing room now. This will give me the option to wait for New Years, when quite a few teachers quit or retire, if I want to wait for other possible jobs. But, as they say...a bird in the hand...God, I'm so confused...lol.
    No problem. I've kept up with your story and I honestly feel for you. But the finical aid is a good thing. Like you said, you do have some breathing room, and that's important.

    I always loved learning, that's why I hated study hall. I wanted to be out in the world, exploring new things, meeting new people. That's actually why I joined the USMC. It wasn't to Serve or Protect, it was to explore my world. Then I got in and realized that if I was a combat personnel, I'd probably be shipped over seas to some hole in the ground...
    Who dares to teach must never cease to learn.

  9. #9
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    Well, from one veteran to another...Semper Fi. Myself, I was in the Air Force, retired in 2002. People would ask, why the Air Force, and I would tell them I didn't join the military to be a fighter. If I had wanted to crawl around in the dirt, shooting guns, I would have joined the army or marines.

    But it was in the Air Force where I learned the value of a college education. I mean I was often working for some second lieutenant, where the only real difference between us was a college degree. Was never too impressed with the officer core. So, I got my degree. Now I'm a teacher.

    I don't miss much from my military days. What I do miss, however, is the sense of comradery, and how people really looked after each other, how most supervisors and commanders took care of their troops. I haven't found this kind of loyalty in the civilian world, especially in the world of public education. Hense, my sorry story. Too many school administrators afraid to support and defend their teachers, to do the right thing by their students and staff. It's sad.

  10. #10

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    Ya, it is sad. Luckily, in my district teachers are in short supply. We have to look out for each other, otherwise we will wake up one day and not have a job and then we're a teacher short. And that's not good (duh). We're a really great district, but if we loose too many teachers, they'll ship our students out, and NONE of us want that.
    Who dares to teach must never cease to learn.

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