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  1. #1
    Probationary Member
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    Mar 2012
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    Default how to deal with students with behavioral problems

    i want to know how to deal with problems like anger issues

  2. #2
    Junior Member
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    Jul 2008
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    Michigan
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    Dear Sped:
    Pray!All joking aside, I think it is the most difficult behavior to control. My best answer, is to try and "catch" the student before he/she escalates.Sometimes it's a verbal cue ,sometimes it's a small visual cue, depends on the student. I try and give them a quick break in the hall, or counselors office. No, it doesn't always work, and I end up with a fight in my classroom or later in the hall. I wish I knew how to deal with this behavior better too! Good Luck!

  3. #3
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    Jun 2007
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    As PP said, dealing with anger issues is the most difficult (IMHO) behavior issue to deal with. I often feel like no matter what I do to try and be proactive, I am almost always dealing with anger issues in a reactive manner.

    Some things I have found that are helpful:

    Structured setting as much as possible.
    TALK TALK TALK about options they can use when angry or frustrated. Allow at least one option to be a place outside of the classroom.
    Practice using the options and stress how they result in a more positive outcome than the consequences of angry behavior.
    And the big one...
    Remain calm, no matter what. Become hyped up or responding to them in a negative way only amps them up and makes the situation worse.

  4. #4
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    Apr 2012
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    create daily behavior charts... for every 'point' earned for positive behavior, a student can earn 1 minute of free time doing something fun of their choice, such as computer time, drawing time, or game time

  5. #5
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    Apr 2012
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    Unoriginal -- well put, I think. And yes, anger behaviors pose huge challenges simply because the "meltdowns" create the biggest interuption. Student A melts down, cusses at the teacher, then beats student B up at lunch. Now not only are two students in a bad way, the whole building is talking about the fight at lunch and no one wants to let it go.

    Uno is right about remaining calm. The moment you get "amped," you are giving control of you into the student's hands. More importantly, you're modeling the behavior you want the student to stop if you get worked up.

    Some questions/suggestions beyond Uno --
    Is this student seeing the behavior specialist or counselor regularly as part of IEP services? If not, he should be (assuming male -- could be wrong!). He/she needs to be building coping skills not just in-situ but in role play and practice with a qualified individual.

    Have you tried theraputic breaks? If the student enjoys art, one of their "options" might be 10 minutes with the art teacher to draw through a stressful or upsetting concern. It could also be PE (toss the baseball/basketball/football or jog for 10 minutes with the school gym teacher) or banging a drum in the music room. As these become more effective, the student can even do a little school work in that environment so he's still working in the curriculum. I've had tremendous success with this. Student has stopped throwing chairs at my science teacher. For him, this is big progress.

  6. #6
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    Sep 2012
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    Australia
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    You should understand their escalation cycle. This cycle explains the steps that a student goes through as the misbehave. Calm them and here is a period of calm, where nothing is wrong. Make eye contact without staring down. Be sure to consider the cultural diversity of your students when implementing behavior strategies.

  7. #7
    Probationary Member
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    Jan 2013
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    hello,
    first try to understand the reason of his anger and frustration and talk with him or her.just deal with the issue in a positive manner don't show your anger,as student may feel more frustrated try to support them with positive things like giving marks or praising them

  8. #8
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    Feb 2013
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    My best advice is to establish a relationship with the child. There are several techniques you can use: positive reinforcement, procedures and routines, keep him engaged with interesting activities. You don't specify your situation, but another is to identify the purpose of the behavior. Watch this video of a Psychologist explaining some great challenging behavior techniques:

    [video=http://youtu.be/X1wRkd7c6lA]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1wRkd7c6lA[/video]

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