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KinderKera
12-02-2007, 05:44 PM
Hello All,
I am wondering about naptime in kindergarten. Please respond and tell me if you have it in your kindergarten, how long children rest for, why you do or don't do it and what (if anything) you do while children rest. Thanks so much!

mopar
12-02-2007, 08:16 PM
Well, I have experienced two types of kindergarten.
Our half day programs do not incorporate rest time mostly because of the time restraints.
Our full day program does incorporate a nap/rest time. The students are given a pad and asked to lay down for 30 minutes. If the students have not fallen asleep in 30 minutes they may get a puzzle or book to read or look at quietly at their pad. The nap time lasts for about 2 hours depending on the students. They are allowed to nap longer if they choose, however, the other students may begin moving around the room after 2 hours and receive a snack. The belief is that students need time to rest to develop and need a downtime.

Stacy B
03-13-2008, 02:58 PM
My son's kindergarten goes from 7:45 - 3. His class does do a rest time. At the first of the year, it is a 30 minute nap time. Towards the end of the year, it is more of a quiet, reading time.

jsfowler
03-13-2008, 03:02 PM
Our district does not have nap time. They attend school from 7:45 to 2:30. Naps ended about 15 - 20 years ago...I think because so many of them didn't nap at that age and it just creates conflict. I know my son quit napping at 4 years old. For those children that do need down time, I think quiet time is more appropriate for kindergarten.

dangercat
03-13-2008, 03:03 PM
Hello All,
I am wondering about naptime in kindergarten. Please respond and tell me if you have it in your kindergarten, how long children rest for, why you do or don't do it and what (if anything) you do while children rest. Thanks so much!

No, there is no naptime or extended rest time in the district that I do my student work in. My daughter is in Kindergarten and I have enough trouble getting her to bed, I can't imagine how hard that would be if she also had a nap. I think by that age since they are going to school the full day that the nap isn't needed. In preschool naptime worked because the children needed that extra time to relax.

irish223
03-13-2008, 08:32 PM
I teach full-day kindergarten, and my district does not have nap times. I don't know how I would cover all the curriculum that's expected if my students had naps!

I don't really even have a quiet time, other than book time. That's when the students can choose a book to look through. During that time, some students do nod off for a bit sometimes, but most do not.

MrsR
03-18-2008, 05:04 PM
In a district that I used to sub in they had "rest/quiet time" right after lunch. During this time the kids could sit on the carpet or on a big pillow on the floor and either just lay down or look at a book. It lasted about 15 minutes.

Kinder ND
05-30-2008, 02:23 PM
I have rest-time in my classroom but I call it a "Brain Vacation." My students bring towels to school and after lunch they roll out their towels and give their brain a vacation for 20 minutes. I start "Brain Vacation" with quiet music and help everyone get situated, then I read chapter books. I start reading chapter books on the first day of school. :)

I feel that kindergarten students need some kind of down-time at the beginning of the school year to help their bodies adjust to the daily routine. I find that it takes about 6 to 8 weeks for my entire class to become acclimated to the schedule (some students even longer). Like I mentioned above, my "Brain Vacation" is only 20 minutes or so. Some students do relax and fall asleep in that short period and they will wake up when the students start moving around to start our afternoon learning centers. If I have a habitual sleeper, I let the parents know and in due-time their body gets use to the schedule as well.

I phase out "brain vacation" after semester time and our routine changes a little bit. I continue to read chapter books after lunch but students have the option to color & draw quietly or they can continue using their towel to rest. In time, nobody uses their towels and I eventually send them all home. I phase out rest time based on the needs of the students. Some years we keep towels until April, but other years I have had them all sent home in January.

As adults, we have our own ways of "brain vacations" and children need them as well. We may take a break by getting a cup of coffee or just having a quiet time in the classroom without kids for a few minutes. Even our drive home from school may be a "brain vacation" where we can relax with less noise. Students need to learn how to relax, give their brain a rest, give their tummies a rest and get ready for more learning as the day goes on.

Boxcar
05-30-2008, 05:04 PM
I love the idea of a "Brain Vacation". The little kids protest at the ideas of "rest", "quiet", and "nap". I am so stealing this. Thank you.

irish223
05-31-2008, 11:29 AM
I love the "Brain Vacation" too! Thanks, Kinder ND, I hope you don't mind if I copy you. Since it's not a true nap time, I'm sure my admin won't object.

This is my second year in kdg, and I've never thought of reading chapter books to my students. Do you mind sharing some of the titles you read?

Want2Teach
05-31-2008, 11:57 AM
We don't do nap time, but we have a few minutes quiet time in the afternoon for those who don't leave midday. Usually I read to them, whereas their regular teacher allowed them to watch 30 minutes of video (cartoons or G rated shows).

I really try to discourage TV, so I cannot in good conscience tell kids to sit down and watch it.

I only subbed for this group the last three weeks of the year. One thing I did notice was that it is obvious most five and six year olds aren't getting the recommended 10 hours of sleep each night.

I realize that parents lead busy lives, but they really should make a point of having a strict schedule for the little ones. The ones who come in rested and refreshed do so much better both behaviorally and academically. If the majority of your class is rest deprived, a nap may be in order just to recharge them in the afternoons.

irish223
05-31-2008, 12:17 PM
I only subbed for this group the last three weeks of the year. One thing I did notice was that it is obvious most five and six year olds aren't getting the recommended 10 hours of sleep each night.

I realize that parents lead busy lives, but they really should make a point of having a strict schedule for the little ones. The ones who come in rested and refreshed do so much better both behaviorally and academically. If the majority of your class is rest deprived, a nap may be in order just to recharge them in the afternoons.

I TOTALLY agree! I was shocked this year to find that fully half of my students have a television in their bedrooms, and are allowed to watch TV after they go to bed. Many of them watch inappropriate shows like Adult Swim on Cartoon Network. In addition to their lack of energy, the influence of those shows can be seen in their classroom behavior!

Boxcar
05-31-2008, 01:29 PM
I agree too. Many of the preschoolers at the low SES center come in without having sleep the needed amount. They arrve at six and must wait unil eight to have breakfast. The parents are kind, good, and loving, but they need assistance in creating a schedule that fits their and thier child's needs.