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TennisPlayer
08-24-2007, 01:56 PM
I have only had 2 interviews for specific teaching jobs
within 3 years (they were last week and they chose someone
who has had their own classroom.)

I do not understand why I am not getting more interviews.
I am qualified to teach both General and Special Ed in
addition to having a Masters Degree. I have been
substituting for the past 3 years in several school districts, ever since I graduated from graduate school.

Any ideas on what else I can be doing to get hired?
People have told me I am a great teacher, I am very
organized, responsible, etc.

I appreciate your time and any ideas you have.

fireboat
08-29-2007, 01:54 AM
I have only had 2 interviews for specific teaching jobs
within 3 years (they were last week and they chose someone
who has had their own classroom.)

I do not understand why I am not getting more interviews.
I am qualified to teach both General and Special Ed in
addition to having a Masters Degree. I have been
substituting for the past 3 years in several school districts, ever since I graduated from graduate school.

Any ideas on what else I can be doing to get hired?
People have told me I am a great teacher, I am very
organized, responsible, etc.

I appreciate your time and any ideas you have.


It could be a number of things....

Depending on your area, teaching jobs might be very hard to come by. In some area of the US (like the area where I live) there can be over 100 candidates for a single open position.

First, begin by backtracking..... ask a close friend of family member to help you out with this..... and tell them to be brutally honest...

- Show them your letters of recommendation. Ask them if they see ANY potential red flags. Even if it's something you overlooked yourself. If there are any, then get a new letter from someone else.

- Go your your resume and cover letter with them. Be 100% positive there are no type-ohs or ambiguous wording. Again, have them look for any red flags you might have missed.

- Be sure your cover letter has a powerful opening sentence and philosophy statement. Be sure the layout is attractive-- not too plain so it gets lost in the pile. (same w/ resume)

IF all of that is in place and okay.... then you might need to market yourself more aggressively. Do whatever it takes to network with teachers and principals. Principals are much more likely to interview people they've actually met.

Lastly, keep building your resume-- don't sit idle. Keep subbing. And, each day you go into the school-- make a point to make a little smalltalk with the principal. And be sure he/she knows you're hoping for an interview next time there is an opening.

Good luck.

- Tim

P.S. The eBook may help you with some thoughts and/or ideas: Guide to Getting a Teaching Job ( http://www.iwantateachingjob.com )

amgrzy
08-29-2007, 04:39 PM
Apply like crazy - even in undesirable schools/districts. Most interviewers favor someone with more longterm experience.

Create a beautiful portfolio with unique lesson ideas you've developed/executed.

Don't give up - in many areas the teacher market is saturated. Is isn't uncommon in my area for a teacher to be subbing and applying for 2-3 years before landing a job.

Good luck.

stumpturtle
10-29-2007, 12:38 PM
Hello I am in the same boat you are in, I thought after finishing my Master degree last May by September I would have a teaching job in the local school district. Well, the summer came and went with not interviews. All I can say is don't give up and practice refining youer interview responses. Good Luck!
Lois

Oak Tree
10-29-2007, 03:55 PM
Apply to schools in the ghetto.

metcat2000
10-29-2007, 04:03 PM
HA!! Funny! I'm a fairly new teacher....in the ghetto. :rolleyes:

Are you asking questions at your interview?? They like that, it shows that you are interested in them and want to know more.. Good luck

Boxcar
10-30-2007, 11:46 AM
Two things most of the teachers I know swear by are awesome portfolios and ghetto schools!

You can also try volunteering at a school. I know, it takes up time you don't even have. But it does get your foot in the door. The more visable you are, the more they will think of you. Obviously, pick a school with a relatively high turnover. This means that you'll get an opening sooner. Yes, it does also mean that you will have to deal with a lot of negative stuff. Still, if you are willing to do your time, you might be able to be picked up by another school once you have experience.

My final idea is this. Take one or two college courses as a "refresher". You will be around for on-campus job fairs, have more sources for recommendation letters, and some college programs will help place you. Plus, the classes will look good on your resume.

Good luck!

Chef Dave
11-12-2007, 10:16 AM
I have only had 2 interviews for specific teaching jobs
within 3 years (they were last week and they chose someone
who has had their own classroom.)

I do not understand why I am not getting more interviews.
I am qualified to teach both General and Special Ed in
addition to having a Masters Degree. I have been
substituting for the past 3 years in several school districts, ever since I graduated from graduate school.


How proactive are you? Are you sitting by the phone waiting for it to ring? If you want a job, you'll have to be more aggressive.

Since you've been working as a substitute, start button holing the building administrators at any of the schools you've worked at. Talk to them about your interest in working as a teacher. Are they even aware that you're looking for a job? Be sure to have a copy of your resume when you talk to them. Don't expect them to know who you are simply because you've been a substitute for three years.

It could well be that your application is simply "buried" in the system. If nobody knows you're looking for a job, why would anyone request your application file?

Secondly - do you have letters of recommendation from any of the building administrators you've worked for? Have you included the names of these administrators as references on your application?

Thirdly - have you been in touch with the director of human resources regarding the status of your application? You should check back regarding the availability of jobs. You should also go on-line and check to see what vacancies are available.

I once got a job by mailing a copy of my resume with an accompanying letter of introduction to every building administrator in a given district. The administrator who hired me told me that she liked my assertiveness because it helped differentiate me from all of the other applicants.

How are you at interviews? You may want to brush up on your interviewing techniques. Do you make eye contact with your interviewer? Is your voice clear or do you mumble. Is your body language appropriate to the situation i.e. leaning slightly forward in your seat with relaxed arms instead of sitting back in your seat with arms folded and feet crossed?

If you have a portfolio, do you know how to use it?

A common mistake with portfolios is that applicants expect the interviewer to review the portfolio. This is not the appropriate way to use a portfolio and savvy interviewers will watch you to see what you do.

The proper way to use a portfolio is to integrate it into your interview.

For example, if the interviewer asks you whether you're a creative teacher, illustrate your answer by showing this person a picture of a project you implemented while working as a student teacher. Wow this person with a lesson plan.

By doing this, not only will you have demonstrated your creativity - but you will have also demonstrated your sense of organization.

I once had an administrator friend tell me about an interview in which the applicant arrived with a portfolio AND a box of handicrafts.

The administrators deliberately avoided asking about the portfolio and the accompanying box ... and the applicant never stepped up to the plate. End result? She wasn't hired.

Best wishes,

David

EricDNA
11-12-2007, 03:59 PM
Go West! They need teachers in Nevada! Administrators have different styles so don't get bent out of shape when you come across the weird ones. It's a wonder how they even get into the positions. Good Luck.

Missmaggie
11-15-2007, 09:45 AM
Where do you live? I live in Northern New Jersey, outside Manhattan, and Elem. Ed teachers here are a dime a dozen, but they desperately need High School and Middle School Teachers. I agree with all the other posts here...I have been unemployed for a year, I keep taking jobs at preschools or day cares thinking it's great for me, not realizing I needed to get to know some people in the districts if they wanted to know me. So I've been Substitute teaching, and I love it!

It's not so bad, at least I'm getting to know people, getting to know the difference among the districts and their schools, learning new techniques. You might want to try it. Then when a maternity replacement is needed they will remember you, and give you a call before going to candidates they have never seen before. And maybe in the spring when they start hiring again, you'll be on the list of great teachers they want as part of their district. Or try a private school...go to CarneySandoe.com they are linked with schools all over the country.

Missmaggie
11-15-2007, 11:38 AM
Hi , why not try being a substitute teacher? It is fun and you get a chance to know the administration and show them you are a reliable and warm person and great with the kids...you build an invaluable rapport. There are a bunch of subs and student teachers in my district that are "waiting in line" to be hired. I only found out this gossip while subbing as an aide for another teacher, who turned out to be very knowledgeable about the hiring process in my town.

I have had teachers with Master's degrees tell me they were aides first, or that they were replacing another teacher on maternity who decided not to come back...either way you get your chance to really shine!

In Northern NJ we are a dime a dozen, so I know how you feel! also try Carney Sandoe Associates. they are good too and the ghetto.

Chef Dave
11-15-2007, 11:52 AM
If you're willing to relocate, jobs abound in most inner city schools. Chicago, Pittsburgh, New York City, Los Angeles, Houston, Phoenix, Miami, and Las Vegas are always looking for teachers.

Missmaggie
11-17-2007, 03:45 PM
Sorry, I missed where you wrote that you have already been subbing. I went on a group interview recently with 3 other girls, one of which was certain to get the job even though she was my age or probably younger.

Why? Because she had been teaching in Newark, NJ, a crime-filled city that is usually undesirable to most people. She had been teaching First grade for maybe a year or two, but had the best answers for every question, and seemed like she really knew what she was doing and had confidence in herself. After that interview, I realized I needed to do the same. I am in the process of applying as a sub for some ghetto districts now as a sub.

I also have a friend who told me if I wanted to work in her school (in Manhattan) I would need to first have all of my certifications complete with NY(which I am in the process of). Then I would need to apply as a sub, so I am ready for them to hire me at any time.

Another teacher told me to keep sending my resumes out constantly to each district I am interested in, because if they like my resume, they will hold onto it.

Boxcar
11-17-2007, 03:57 PM
i'd also stop in at schools in the area and ask, in person, if they have a job. Be friendly and sweet. Volunteer to help out with little things too. When they have an opening, they will remember you because they have a face to put with the resume. They will either think "Maybe now that annoying person will be off our backs." or "You know, that person who is so sweet should apply for this. I'll put her resume on top."